© 2019 by Shetland Classic Motorycle Club

The club owes it origin to the late Tommy Watt of Lerwick who, in 1984 as a committee member of the then Islesburgh Motorcycle Club, thought it would be a good idea to gather together all the old motorcycles in Shetland for a local Classic Motor Show. Although the Show was small, with only about 40 bikes and 7 cars, it was deemed a great success and attracted many visitors from all over the islands.

A Brief History of the SCMCC

This first show was the catalyst needed and, again at Tommy’s instigation, a meeting of likeminded enthusiasts was held on 26th February, 1985 and “The Classic Section” of the Islesburgh Motorcycle Club was formed. Among other things, it was agreed that the section would organise: runs, club meetings, newsletters, film shows, exhibitions and last, but by no means least, a supply of straight 40 grade oil. To arrange this, Tommy Watt, Vic Thomas, Dave Diamond, George Jacobson and Joe Gray agreed to be on a small subcommittee of the parent club.

The late Tommy Watt at the second Shetland Classic Motor Show

For the 1992 season there was a big change and, with the agreement of the parent club, the Shetland Classic Motor Cycle Club was formed as an entirely separate entity. The Chairman was Vic Thomas, Secretary George Jacobson and Treasurer Dave Diamond. The supporting committee were Tommy, Watt, John Goudie, Joe Gray, Gordon Stark and Gibbie Fraser. 

With the addition of necessary office bearers such as Membership Secretary, Regalia Officer, Runs Coordinator and Webmaster to keep up with needs, the club has since continued to fulfil its main objectives of:

  • Fostering the interest of classic motorcycle enthusiasts in Shetland

  • Promoting the camaraderie and enjoyment that the vintage and classic motorcycle movement offers

  • Liaising with similar groups on the Mainland and forming links with like-minded groups and individuals

  • Co-ordinating activities and provide a flow of information between members

The inaugural run was held in conjunction with a display of stationary engines and bikes on 11th May, 1985 and attracted 15 bikes dating from 1932 to 1966. There were 13 bikes on the run, but this number was by no means unlucky as many runs, club nights, etc. have followed and been greatly enjoyed.

One of the first runs in 1985